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Choosing Your A-level Subjects


Subject choices merit careful attention. Genuine interest, career considerations and ability are the three essentials. Pupils are advised to consult as widely as necessary before settling on their options.

A pupil’s timetable framework is drawn up based on his or her own choices; while there can be no guarantees, it is usually possible for our students to study the combination of subjects that they wish.

University entry requirements

There are particular subjects that are required for entry to certain degree courses. For example, medicine requires Biology and usually Chemistry. Engineering usually requires Mathematics and Physics. However, some degrees have no specific subject requirements.

Details of subjects required can be researched using information available from our careers department, university websites/prospectuses and the UCAS website.

Subjects for more selective universities

Competition for places at top universities is fierce. Information on typical A-level grades needed to gain places on university courses can be researched via the UCAS website and university websites and prospectuses. The Russell Group previously published a list of subjects which can be particularly useful for pupils who aren’t sure what to study at university. These subjects are considered essential for many degrees and so can open lots of doors. Now that the Russell Group have created their Informed Choices website, it is no longer necessary to publish such a list. Here pupils can explore the various degrees and subject areas they are interested in to build up a more personalised picture of the subject combinations that suit their talents and ambitions.

View The Russell Group’s informed choices guide

Preparing pupils for life

All A-level subjects offered at Stockport Grammar School provide excellent preparation for employment and higher education, but the purpose of sixth form at Stockport Grammar School is also to prepare pupils for life in the broadest possible way.

Whatever they study, it is vital that pupils continue to develop good organisational and time management skills and that they learn to work independently. Employers and higher education alike value such assets enormously.